Interview with Perth Comedian; Patrick Marlborough

Patrick Marlborough is a Perth based comedian and freelance writer, namely for Vice and Junkee. Last February Patrick dropped his first comedy ‘mixtape’ “Barley Bombings – Goofs By Patrick Marlborough”. Barley bombings is a collection of Marlborough’s live performances recorded over the past 2 years. His recent debut is fearlessly funny. Barley Bombings provides an unarticulated and unfiltered discourse on topics surrounding suburban Perth, Mental health and the crazy world of Australian politics, policies and Pinga culture. Barley Bombings will make you hate JB-HiFi even more and make you realize that you actually miss Osama Bin Laden. Patrick and I hung out at JB Hi-Fi, I asked him some questions and we checked out what the ‘best of Australian comedy’ section had to offer. We didn’t buy anything.

 Hi Patrick, It seems you have a love hate relationship with being Australian.

Yeah, definitely. It’s a tricky one. I always have since I was a little kid. Australian jingoism – there’s something extremely off-putting about it – essentially we’re a country founded on the destruction of the world’s oldest most intricate culture. And all that we have to show for it is like, the ARIA Awards, Li’l Elvis and the Truckstoppers, and the collected eye-rolls of David Marr (laughs).

Have you really been arrested 5 times in Bali on drug charges?

No, I’m a good boy. I don’t do the drugs – well, only prescription meds and coffee.
I’ve actually never been to Bali, too many Perth folk there. Second only to Melbourne.

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Do you think Australian pop-culture will ever mature into something more than Pingas, Bunnings sausage sizzles and Bali tats?

I actually think we have an amazing culture. But I know what you mean. You have to remember that our cultural cringe has been driven by government policy and a collage of ingrained bigotries. You have a generation of Australian’s who were raised by the Howard curriculum and don’t know any better. We’ve been told to hold the arts in disdain because that means we hold critical thinking in disdain. Our scope has been limited, it’s hard for any young artists anywhere to get their voices heard – our cultural gatekeepers are Sydney good ol’ boys jerking it to Vivaldi and dropping anecdotes about feuding with an unaware Bob Ellis. It’s tragic, but a change is gonna come. You’d hope. How is Philip Adams’ health, anyway?

Can you have national pride in Australia and not be a racist?

I’m yet to see it. I mean, my parents are very patriotic but they’re incredibly left wing. It does often come at the cost of ignoring our past, however. Look at our national discourse. Just look at the past two weeks, with the Elijah Doughty decision, and the government denying the rights of the LGBT community for marriage equality. This turd wrangle of a plebiscite, cooked up by callous intellectual nomads who wouldn’t know a loving embrace from spraying Lynx Africa on their balls. I’m only very patriotic when I’m overseas (laughs). I do take pride in the fact that we have a good minimum wage, but again, I’m raised by unionists (laughs).

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Do you think Australia needs to rebrand itself to show it’s more than its pop-culture stereotypes?

The ‘Crocodile Dundee’ stereotypes (if you travel) can be condescending – but Australians also revel in that. The world perceives us as these laid back, cool, funny guys but in reality…we’re  essentially a nation of fuckbois. Australia is like the guy your ex-girlfriend starts dating who is seemingly just a cool scene-kid, but actually has a deeply problematic history of abuse.

Hilariously, the larrikin myth stems from two satirists – Lawson and Patterson – taking the piss out of the very people who would later adopt it as our defining trait, their persona. It’s our great, fundamental, national irony.

And how we relate to the USA? America is the 80s sports movie douchebag doing coke and threatening to tear down the community center, we are their gimpy side kick named ‘Percy’ or ‘Tum-Tum’ or some such.

I guess I want to put the ‘nah’ in Australiana.

Your various personas on stage are hilarious. Where did you learn this skill?

I’m on the autism spectrum, and I’m hypomanic and hyper-associative – so mimicry is how I learned to communicate with people. As a kid, I was obsessed with imitating every cartoon character, Buggs Bunny is my biggest influence as a comic. My favorite impression to do as a kid was John Howard. I used to put an orange swim cap on and fake glasses and ape his blubbery drawl.

I have vivid memories of being sent to the naughty bench the day after 9/11 for performing a bit that was essentially Kermit reporting the news as it happened, and The Count doing the body tally. Weird kid, for sure.

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What do you find off-putting about today’s mainstream Australian comedy?

I find mainstream Australian comedy offputting because it’s the same gaggle of ‘faildads’ in their mid-40s that have been in the spotlight for what feels like my entire life. Our comedy, particularly our standup, bends towards the tame, the status quo. It’s incredibly middle class and reactionary, there’s a reason we have little to no history of serious political stand-up in the Bruce or Pryor mold. It’s depressing, but we’ve always been like that as a nation. Australians love to punch down: we love cruelty, we love slurs, we love alienating those without a voice. We hate it when that is turned back on us. This is why Chris Lilley is showered in Logies when he should probably be showered in shit and day old mayonnaise from the Bayswater DOME. This is why people like John Clarke, Rob Stitch, Gina Riley, Jane Turner, and more recent voices like Briggs and the Kates are important. But there’s few like them in Australian stand-up, it caters to the festival crowd, which weirdly, is its own kind of conservative. We make progress with content sometimes, but almost never with form.

In 2017, if your comedy isn’t punching up, advocating for something, or making this country face up to its barbarism, then get off the pot, we don’t need more of your middling shit.

Thanks, Patrick. When and where can I catch your next show?

I have a couple of shows at Fremantle Comedy Factory in September (Sail and Anchor), and will hopefully be doing some gigs over East this October. There also might be another surprise audio thingy dropping soon.

Check out Patrick’s comedy page NERT here and catch him on Twitter here.

 

Interview and photography by Harry Cunningham

Contributors Meeting


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Want to contribute to Metior? Have any ideas about how Metior can improve? Come to the Metior Contributors Meeting! Why should you join Metior? Get exposure, Improve your resume, make new friends and meet new people! At this event we will introduce the new editor, talk about our new vision for Metior, have an insiders preview of the next issue, and brainstorm some new ideas (bring your ideas along!).

Positions: Head of Opinion, news, film, art, Music, social media management + more

[FASHION] MEET PATTY

 

Patty Curral is a 22 year old studying graphic design here at Murdoch. In July 2016, she created a street wear brand label called LOSO Apparel. I took some time to get to know more about her, and LOSO Apparel.

 

Hi Patty, How did you start designing for your own street wear label?

“One of the Graphic Design courses here at Murdoch called ‘Brand and Identity’ (IDD202) was based around coming up with a logo and merging it with a product to sell.  That’s when I created LOSO. I really loved that course, and it taught me how much I love designing my own product, it gave me so much satisfaction (Shout out to my tutor Erica Ormsby!).”

 

“I would always see so many streetwear companies soley targeted at men, so I wanted to make a change”

 

So what does LOSO actually mean?

“So, it’s a Thai slang word, which stands for low society (in a joking way). In Thailand if you’re a cheap skate they call you a LOSO. When I would go out with my friends in Thailand I would rather dress comfortable than dress up, so they would call me “LOSO” (laughs), so my nickname became the brand:) “

What are your inspirations behind LOSO?

“I would always see so many streetwear companies soley targeted at men, so I wanted to make a change to the scene and introduce my own Street Wear label. I love hip-hop music so that was an inspiration behind my designs, but I also think it’s a great way to show what music you’re into or to show off your idols, these make a great ice breaker when meeting new people.”

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Where would you like to see LOSO heading in the future?

“To be honest I’d love to see it being featured in a shop like Culture Kings, that is a big dream of mine. Of course I could open my own pop up shop but it’s a bit too much to handle, with uni and lack of money at the moment (laughs).”

How can people look at and buy LOSO apparel?

“You can check us out on Instagram @losoapparel, Facebook /LOSOapparel and https://www.losoapparel.com/

[REVIEW] Kung Fu Panda 3

 

Dreamworks is one of the best animation studios in the world. They are responsible for a huge chunk of people’s childhood, especially for me. Dreamworks make great, popular franchises and stay true to their name. From Madagascar to Shrek – they all had great ideas, stories and characters. This is also the case for Kung Fu Panda 3. Kung Fu Panda 3 was directed by Jennifer Yuh Nelson and Alessandro Carloni and features the voices of Jack Black, Angelina Jolie, Dustin Hoffman and many more.

The main thing that makes a good sequel is the ability it has to reflect on the past. Sequels should be able to either explain the events of the previous movies or mention the events of the previous movies. Kung Fu Panda 3 does this right from the beginning. The main plot of the film revolves around Kai, a yak, stealing chi from different masters and turns them into his jade army and it is up to the Dragon Master Po to stop him.

Things that make this film great: 1) Master Oogway is back! 2) It explains a lot of the things that have happened in the first film. So if you have questions after watching the previous titles, this one should answer all of your questions. That is not all! The main antagonist, Kai, is a super-badass! He literally steals the master’s Ki (part of Chinese philosophy and medicine) turning them into fully coated green zombies which are under his control! That is awesome! He is definitely a great villain. Not only that but the humour is great! There were a lot of laughs especially when Po gets shocked that all of his friends and become green only to say to Matis “Except for you Mantis you were already green” was awesome!

Things that I slightly disliked: 1) The Furious Five play a little role in this film except for Tigeress, 2) It still keeps the annoying gimmick of Po being amazed of his powers and 2.5) Jackie Chan’s role in it. I didn’t mind him playing a secondary character in ‘The Karate Kid’ because he had great scenes, but his character of Monkey doesn’t get much exposure in the film.

Other than those things, I really enjoyed it and think it’s the best of the series so far. It has an interesting plot with an awesome villain. I give it 4.5/5!

If you want me to review something please let me know via the comments below or via the Facebook page.

An Interview with Circle’s Director and Writer

One Hell of a Show. The Road to Success. A Modicum of Inspiration.

Play: Circle

Company: Modicum Theatre (Perth Inc)
Director: Leigh Fitzpatrick
Writer: Sean Wcislo
Venue: Studio 411, 90 South Street (Murdoch University)
Showings: Thursday Opening night: July 28th, 29th & 30th

Leigh Fitzpatrick (Director)
Sean Wcislo (Writer, Assistant director)

Ariana: How did you find the actors for Circle?
Leigh: We found the actors through networking. It was mainly people who knew Sean and his play ‘Roommates Live from Apartment 19’ who showed interest and went to auditions. (on March 4th)

Ariana: What inspired you to write Circle?
Sean: I liked the idea that people go on road trips and things happen. Where these friends get lost and the only source of action/tension was each other. I was also interested in the course their relationships took when they were tested.

Ariana: What was it like working with Modicum Theatre?
Leigh: They have a different viewpoint when it comes to theatre. As the current vice president, I’m very involved in the theatre’s committee. We’re about learning, you’ll never find out if someone’s a born leading performer if they’re stuck playing minor roles.

Sean: I’m glad it happened

Ariana: How long did it take you to write the script for Circle?
Sean: The idea was a few years old. I’ve been adding to it slowly for awhile. At the beginning of this year I really got down to writing the rough draft. I nearly wrote 25% of it in one night.The first draft of the script took me about a month to write.

Leigh: Sean took the script to one of the Roommate Live rehearsals. As I had plenty of time offstage, I was able to read through and I knew then that I wanted to direct it. .

Ariana: What was your artistic vision as director?
Leigh: “I’ve always wondered about the subtlety , “the characters have history” Using minimalism to let the characters speak for themselves without anything distracting is important.

Ariana: What stood out the most during rehearsals?
Sean: I enjoyed how the actors have engaged with the script enough to take their experiences outside of rehearsals.

Ariana: What stood out during the rehearsal process/realising the script on stage?
Leigh: We’ve been having rehearsals for the last four months” There are certain moments in the script that are eminently relatable.” “The cast was great” “Having a five person ensemble made rehearsals more intense and allowed out to concentrate on making the characters ‘humanly real’ and multidimensional.”

Ariana: How were the characters in the script created/inspired?
Sean: the plot and events were planned before the characters. The characters were created based on their necessity, then were fleshed out from there.

Ariana: What was it like working with the production team?
Leigh: I was continually amazed at the quality of the work people were willing to put their efforts into. I am continually amazed as to their love of the arts.

Ariana: What did you do as an assistant director?
Sean: I helped the director with taking notes and filling in when necessary. When Leigh took notes on actors, I’d be supportive by taking notes on the production side and vice versa.

Ariana: How would you describe the play Circle, to an audience?
Leigh: It’s a tragicomedy it’s about the nature of friendship and the pointlessness of hiding from the inevitable. Also it’s about a road trip through hell. So that’s cool.

Links
Modicum Theatre
Circle Event
Tickets and Booking info
Modicum Rehearsals -Instagram

Dracula – Theatre Review

1

 

Music begins to play. On stage, furniture is covered in dust speckled sheets. Half the stage hidden by curtains.  In Dr. Seward’s sanitarium, a man is led astray by his insatiable desires, drawn to madness and hunted in the night…

 
The characters in the play each had their own unique quirks. I personally was interested in how the actors developed their characters non-verbally and when they were bystanders to the action/dialogue. Sometimes the actions of characters and their relationships has a greater impact than dialogue. Van Helsing (Jason Dohle) and Count Dracula (Joel Sammels) went past their stereotypical counterparts. The relationship between Lucy Seward (Toni Vernon) and John Harker (Phillip Hutton) appeared realistically strained on stage, with Lucy’s illness tragically postponing them from being romantically involved or getting married.

The Murdoch Theatre Company has collaborated with the director of Lit by Limelight (a children’s theatre) to develop a set that would be adaptable for the  different productions. For Dracula, the set was designed by Ally Snell with  designs being both sophisticated and durable.  Throughout the play, the stage hands were ‘disguised’ as staff at the Sanitorium which helped with snappy and precise scene changes.

The lighting added to the overall mood of the performance and greatly transformed the stage between settings and scene changes. Lighting was designed by Scott McArdle and manned by Tay Broadley. The sound-scape effectively improved the underlying tension and suspense. The sound was designed by Tim Brain.

The costuming was reminiscent of 19th century fashion and suitably chosen. The costumes for Count Dracula and his brides stood out the most. Costumes were designed by Sophie Braham. The vampires wore coordinated dark red and black outfits. Their undead appearance emphasized with contact lenses, long fingernails, ruby red tattoos and pale complexions. Make up was designed by Leah Toyne. The main special effects in the play included voiceovers, wolf and bat sound effects. The most notable is the use of fog to signal Dracula’s transformation as a bat.

Overall, a great performance was put on by all with all the suspense and terror you could need and my excitement for the next two Gothic plays, The Mummy Rises and Frankenstein,  only increased!

Playwright & Origins of Script

The 1924 stage play was written by Hamilton Deane and was a three act play. Hamilton Deane (1880-1958) was an irish actor, playwright and director. John Balderston was hired by Horace Liveright to revise the play in 1927 for Broadway productions with American audiences. John L. Balderston (1889-1954) was an American playwright and screenwriter. The play was originally presented at the Fulton Theatre in New York City.

The play, Dracula originates from the 1897 Bram Stoker novel, which was first published in the United Kingdom. Bram Stoker was an irish author who started writing in 1872. His interest and writing mainly focused on irish folktales, occult and the supernatural. His focus on these developed while he was bedridden until the age of seven from an unidentified illness. Supernatural folktales have lived on for centuries, from vampires and alongside Stoker’s illness, the story of Dracula was developed. The character of Count Dracula was inspired by the Romanian ruler Vlad Dracula (Vlad the Impaler) who ruled Walachia several times between 1456 and 1462. Since then, several spinoffs and revisions have occurred and it has inspired other books and films around the subject of vampires and the supernatural.

Details
Play: Dracula (Three shows, @ 7:30pm, July 7th, 8th & 9th)
Location: Nexus Theatre (90 South Street, Murdoch University, Carpark 3/near library)
Synopsis: A classic gothic story reimagined on stage, with characters such as the famous Van Helsing and Dracula. Van Helsing is hired to investigate the mystery of Lucy Seward’s illness and its possible link to Renfield’s madness. The play switches settings between Dr Seward sanitorium and their neighbour’s bachelor pad at Carfax.
Genre: Psychological Thriller, Horror Rating: MA15+
Director: John King, presented by Murdoch Theatre Company
Writer: Hamilton Deane, Revised by: John L. Balderston

Links
Dracula-FB Event
Murdoch Theatre Company-FB Page
John King (director) Interview
Dracula- Original Script (1927)
Dracula- 1897 novel
Bram Stoker- Biography information
Vlad Dracula- Britannica Encyclopedia